Dear Readers

A message to our readers from Holt’s managing editor.

When Holt began working in China 20 years ago, most of the children placed for adoption were healthy, infant girls. Today, there is often a greater need for families to adopt boys.

When Holt began working in China 20 years ago, most of the children placed for adoption were healthy, infant girls. Today, there is often a greater need for families to adopt boys.

Every morning for the past few months, I have opened my email to discover a new batch of submissions for the 2013 graduate issue of the Holt magazine — the issue that you are now about to read, featuring yearbook-style photos and updates on Holt adoptees who recently graduated from high school or college.* I cannot express just how much I have enjoyed reading about each and every graduate’s diverse interests and talents, accomplishments and goals. It is such an affirmation of the work we do every day at Holt to see these extraordinary young adult adoptees leading such full, happy lives. And I cannot think of a better way to start my workday than to an inbox full of Holt graduate submissions!

As you look through the yearbook pages of the magazine, you may notice a common trait among many of this year’s graduates. In 1996, Holt saw the first big wave of adoptees join families from China. Seventeen years later, many of the children who came home in that year are now graduating high school. In fact, almost half of this year’s Holt graduates are from China!

As Holt placed our first adoptee from China in 1993, this year also marks 20 years of international adoption and child welfare work in China. In this issue, we take a look back at the past two decades of serving children and families in this east Asian country. So much has changed both culturally and economically in China over the past 20 years that our China program today hardly resembles the program our staff developed in the early 1990s. Most of the children who came home in those early days were healthy, infant girls — the same girls whose lovely faces now appear in the pages of this magazine. Today, the vast majority of children waiting for families in China are older or have minor special needs. Many of them are also boys.

Although much has changed, we still have a clear and compelling purpose in China. In the coming years, we will continue to develop programs for vulnerable children in China. We will continue to seek loving adoptive families for the children who need them. And one day, years from now, I hope to open my inbox to another generation of Holt graduates from China — a generation of sparkling young adult adoptees, most of them with special needs, many of them boys.

Robin Munro | Managing Editor

* Please view the page-turner version of the magazine to see the yearbook spreads.

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