What a Difference a Year Makes

adoption change in a yearThe first year home for a child and his or her adoptive family holds a lot of change, joy, difficulty, patience and love. But one year can make all the difference.

For a child living in an orphanage or foster home overseas, joining an adoptive family often means finally receiving the medical care they need to grow healthy and strong. It means going to occupational or physical therapy to begin to catch up developmentally. It means receiving the love, attention and nurturing care that they went without for so long.

All children have the potential to grow by leaps and bounds with each passing year. But for a child who was just adopted, this growth can be even more profound.

Continue reading “What a Difference a Year Makes”

Pandemic-Proof Care for Children

Ping urgently needed surgery. But due to COVID-19, he couldn’t travel from his orphanage to receive care in Beijing. That’s when Holt China staff, generous donors and local doctors stepped up to help — working remotely to ensure he receive the medical care he needed!

Three-year-old Ping lives in an orphanage in China and is a favorite among his caregivers and friends. He loves to give big hugs and greetings to everyone he meets. He is an amazing little boy.

Like many kids living in orphanages in China, Ping also has special needs. He was born with deformities in both of his wrists and hands. Two of his fingers were misplaced and he couldn’t move them, and his wrists bent all the way towards his thumbs.

orphan medical care
Ping in October when he first arrived at the Peace House.

Despite his limitations, he adapted and did his best.

“Even though he has special needs on his hands,” his orphanage caregivers share, “he tried his best to grab and eat fruits and dumplings.”

But Ping deserved to have the best care, and best future, possible. And doctors recommended that he receive surgery to help correct his hands and wrists.

Continue reading “Pandemic-Proof Care for Children”

Project Gifts of Hope

Through Holt’s Gifts of Hope catalog, English professor and adoptee Tara Robbins Fee helps her students think critically about — and find solutions to — the problems affecting our world.  

Tara with her family.
Tara with her husband and children.

I am a professor of English, wife and mom, and Holt adoptee. I spent my childhood in rural South Jersey, reading Nancy Drew mysteries and Little House books and happily running around in the woods behind the house my parents built. Growing up, I rarely thought about the five months I spent in Korea before the day I arrived at JFK airport in New York City, the day depicted in our family photos, where my mother reaches out to hold me for the first time. That was the moment that I understood as my family origin story. Continue reading “Project Gifts of Hope”

A Miracle for Gracie

Four-year-old Gracie was weeks away from traveling to her adoptive family in the U.S. when COVID-19 hit Haiti. With a heart condition and suppressed immune system, she urgently needed to be on the last known flight leaving Haiti. But no one expected it would take an army of compassion, and a miracle, to get her here.

It was 11:30. The exit letter office closed at noon.

Gracie’s flight — the last known flight leaving Haiti before the country shut down all air travel due to the pandemic — was scheduled to depart at 6 p.m.

Holt’s staff in Haiti had less than four hours to complete her documents so she could be on that flight to Miami, where her dad, Brian, would be waiting for her. Continue reading “A Miracle for Gracie”

Tatum Needs a Family!

Tatum is 8 years old, lives in Colombia and loves to run and play. He is an expressive child who enjoys activities where he can use his imagination such as painting, coloring and building with modeling clay. He also enjoys running, jumping, climbing and playing soccer!

Watch this video to see him do a really cool move on the monkey bars!

Tatum is respectful of adult figures and follows the rules set at school and in his care home. He is shy at times, but works to use his words to share his feelings. His favorite color is blue and he dislikes tuna fish. He is working hard to catch up in school and learns best through stimulation and sensory exercises. Tatum needs a family who has access to excellent educational and therapeutic resources.

The best family for Tatum is one that can provide firm and loving parenting but also promote his love for active and spontaneous play.

Could you or someone you know be the right family for Tatum? We’d love to tell you more about him! Email us at waitingchild@holtinternational.org.

Can a Sewing Machine Actually Help?

sewing machine in CambodiaWhen Narin’s dad lost his job because of the coronavirus pandemic, the Gift of Hope of a sewing machine saved their family.   

Narin’s family was empowered, independent and thriving.

At the beginning of 2020, they were doing well. They had food to eat, a stable income, the children were going to school, and 16-year-old Narin finally had the medical care he needed — all thanks to the generosity of Holt donors.

But then the coronavirus pandemic began. And their family plunged once again into crisis.

Continue reading “Can a Sewing Machine Actually Help?”

A Herd of Sheep, a Lifetime of Hope

For her class community service project, adoptee Anna Hebert launches a fundraising campaign for impoverished families in Mongolia — and raises enough to provide a herd of sheep and goats for three families!

My name is Anna Hebert, and I am currently in 11th grade at a public charter school in Southern California. I was born in a small province in China called Hunan and adopted through Holt as a baby. I have always loved helping out those who are less fortunate than I am.

This whole project started because my school has a graduation requirement to do a community service project. After learning about this graduation requirement in seventh grade, I was really excited to tackle a project that would change the lives of others in a positive way. Continue reading “A Herd of Sheep, a Lifetime of Hope”

My Son’s Second Mother

Adoptive mom Angela Crisanto shares a tribute to her son’s “second mother” — his foster mother — in gratitude for all the love she gave him while in her care in Korea.

Kai with his foster mother in Korea.
Kai with his foster mother in Korea.

For so many months, we had wondered about the family who was taking care of our son.

Before we adopted our older son, he had lived in an orphanage in Vietnam. We were so relieved that in Korea, there were more foster homes to take care of the children — including for our soon-to-be younger son, Kai. Continue reading “My Son’s Second Mother”