2020 Holt Adoptee Scholarship Winners!

Congratulations to Grace Querido, Mei Vader and Grace Rafferty — our three 2020 Adoptee Scholarship winners!

This year, we asked applicants to submit a creative work based on the theme, “A Portrait of Me: An Adoptee.” They each won a $500 scholarship.

Grace Querido

For my piece I decided to paint the different facades of my identity. Growing up in a predominantly white town, it was rare to see other Asian kids let alone Korean kids with white parents. Because of that, I attended a Korean adoptee camp where I met other families that looked like mine, which was a really influential experience. On top of race, my religion made me special because I was usually the only Jew in class. I took my individuality as an opportunity to educate my classmates on adoption, Korea, and Judaism. I included my three different names because they’re the foundation from which I built the rest of my identity. I am fortunate that my parents took us on vacations because I learned I loved to scuba surf, and travel which I hope to continue in the future. The paw prints represent my love for animals and the volunteer work I did at a shelter. My artistic side is shown through my love of Broadway and painting. I was also able to express my athleticism through my high school’s cheerleading team. This painting is the perfect visual representation of who I am. Continue reading “2020 Holt Adoptee Scholarship Winners!”

Honey Clothing Co.: Sweet Fashion with Even Sweeter Intentions

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Honey Clothing Company is a fashion brand started by new mom Elizabeth McGlathery. The brand currently specializes in women’s tees and accessories. While Honey Clothing’s products are certainly sweet and cute, there’s more to the company than simply selling pretty things. Honey Clothing Company also helps children around the world through Holt. 

“I launched Honey Clothing Company ultimately to stay at home with our son,” Elizabeth says. “My husband and I felt like we had missed out on so much of his little life already. So we decided to take a leap of faith.”

As sweet as this sounds, Elizabeth has even sweeter intentions behind her business. One is an exercise of conscience. All of Honey Clothing Company’s tees are sourced from socially responsible manufacturers that take good care of their employees and create their items through eco-friendly practices.

Her other intention is to help support single mothers in South Korea through Holt International. With every order, Honey Clothing Company donates $2 to Holt.

Continue reading “Honey Clothing Co.: Sweet Fashion with Even Sweeter Intentions”

Thomas is waiting for an adoptive family!

Thomas is an easy-going boy who is waiting for a permanent and loving adoptive family.

At 11 years old, Thomas is active and adventurous. He likes to eat all kinds of food, and especially loves chocolate milk. His caregivers say that he is very helpful and polite. He often volunteers to help out with some of the tasks around the orphanage. He also loves to have fun and one of his favorite games is hide and seek. Continue reading “Thomas is waiting for an adoptive family!”

Special COVID-19 Video Series: An Update from VCT in India

In the second video in our series of interviews with Holt program directors around the world,  we have a message from Hepzibah Sharmila, the executive director of Vathsalya Charitable Trust — Holt’s partner organization in Bengaluru, India.

In this video update, Sharmila shares about the effects of the pandemic for children and families living in poverty, and how — with the support of Holt sponsors — she and her team have mobilized to meet their most critical needs.

We hope that you enjoy this update from the field. In this time that Holt staff can’t travel to gather information about the kids in Holt’s programs, we hope this video series encourages you with examples of all the good work you are helping to support around the world.

Click here to watch our special COVID-19 video update from Uganda! And stay tuned for more video interviews from the field!

Holt Camp at Home

As COVID-19 canceled in-person gatherings this summer, Holt Adoptee Camp moved online — offering a virtual camp experience for over 400 youth adoptees, including many adoptees who had never attended Holt camp before.

During Holt Camp at Home, camp staff had two hours a day with each group of about 50 campers.

Holt Camp at Home just completed our first ever camp season online and the experience has been wild! As the effects of COVID-19 spread across the country, closing down schools and many youth summer programs, Holt Adoptee Camp was no exception to the growing risk of meeting together and the decision had to be made to cancel our in-person camp season. Continue reading “Holt Camp at Home”

Back to School, Around the World

All around the world this year, school will look different due to COVID-19. But whether children are physically in a classroom, or learning from home, your gifts will help children continue to learn and stay safe from early marriage and forced labor during this time of global crisis. Here are the current back-to-school plans in each of the countries where Holt kids live!

Whether a child is the daughter of migrant workers in India, lives near the Red Stone garbage dump in Mongolia, or has Down syndrome in Vietnam, education is vital to helping every child overcome poverty and reach their potential in life. It is also a cornerstone to the help that you provide through Holt.

But what about this year? What does back-to-school look like during a global pandemic?

 

Continue reading “Back to School, Around the World”

Adoption: More Than One Moment in Time

Susie Doig, senior executive of U.S. programming, explains why understanding that adoption is more than a single moment in time requires us to take a broader, more comprehensive approach.

Susie Doig with her husband and two children, both adopted from Thailand.
Susie Doig with her husband and two children, both adopted from Thailand.

When most of us think about international adoption, we take a process with lifetime and generational implications and narrow it down to one brief moment in time — the moment an adoptive parent meets their child for the first time. We watch videos of an adoptive parent’s first embrace of their new child; see the child cry and pull away or perhaps fiercely hug the adoptive parent back, and we are overcome by this moment.

Continue reading “Adoption: More Than One Moment in Time”